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  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar
  • Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century,  Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar

SOLD Religious Panel, Oak, 19th Century, Very Large, Perhaps from Side Altar

SKU:
11334
$7,900.00

Product Description

Based on information from one of our good customers, Father Daniel Dom in summation he believes this is Jesus "breaking bread" with two disciples when they realized who their guest was having believed Jesus was dead.  The carvings on either side represent the angels of resurrections.  His detailed and wonderful thoughts and interpretation is shown below.   Very large at 6 foot wide x 5 foot tall.  Please note once received in the USA, a little restoration will be completed, cleaning, waxing and movement of the panels to close the gaps.   DIMENSIONS:  Width:81.5 Inches  Height:63.78 Inches  Depth:10 Inches .Dimensions:    Shipping Additional. Please call with any questions and for a shipping quote 410-745-3700.  LAYAWAY AVAILABLE
 
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Provided interpretation:
 I do believe this scene is of Christ in His eventide resurrection appearance in Emmaus, where He made Himself known to two of His disciples (men) in "the breaking of the bread" - at a meal to which the men had invited Him (not knowing who He actually was).  This would explain why there are two men, and also why they are kneeling at the table when Jesus is clearly sitting, and why Jesus is in the middle and holding His hands in a position that is rather unusual. This scene is not abbreviated version of the "Last Supper," even though it a parallel representation.  The scene is snapshot of the disciples about two seconds after they recognized Jesus was their guest - that's why they are now kneeling rather than sitting at the table - and why one is showing surprise and the other an attitude of quiet adoration - the two elements which certainly characterized their realization of who their guest was. They thought He was dead and buried and here He is, He had spent several miles walking a teaching them, and now He was eating with them.
 The two figures on either side of the central panel are probably the "angels of the resurrection." There is no biblical indication for them being seen at the appearance at Emmaus, but it was they who first announced the Resurrection to the women who were first to arrive at Jesus' tomb early Easter morning.  My guess is the artist took a typical liberty (arising from the mindset of medieval devotion, it's a neo-Gothic piece) and put them in adoring positions (i.e. separate panels outboard the center one) in a total scenario which is symbolic of a celebration of the Eucharist.  (Angels are typically represented adoring the Eucharistic bread; angels are often stationed at either end of an altar, etc.)  The reason I believe they are angels is because of their positions and attitudes in the who scenario, and what they are wearing. They are, therefore, not saints, nor are they the patrons who commissioned the panel itself. One will say these figures do not have wings.  That's true, but angels do not actually have wings, nor do they wear clothes - they are pure spirit beings.  But in the artistic renderings of the middle ages they are usually depicted wearing either copes or a deacon's dalmatic and stole, (these two are in copes), with a jeweled headband (which these two figures are wearing as well) and with wings. (Wings  indicate the angelic characteristic of rapid travel since angels can move from point A to point B without passing the distance between; such "travel" taking no time whatsoever.  So, again, the medieval mind put wings on angels to represent this aspect of angelic being. Angels do not necessarily need to have wings in artistic representation, but in medieval art I think their absence is unusual.) Obviously these two figures do not have wings. Hence, I think that is a bit  unusual. But so are Jesus' curls and His hand positions!  But it is clearly Jesus.

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